INDEPENDENT CURATORS INTERNATIONAL
EN MAS’

Nicolás Dumit Estévez

  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, 2014 at Museo Folklórico Don Tomás Morel, Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic. Photograph: Raymond Marrero.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, 2014 at Museo Folklórico Don Tomás Morel, Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic. Photograph: Raymond Marrero.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, 2014 at Museo Folklórico Don Tomás Morel, Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic. Photograph: Raymond Marrero.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, 2014 at Museo Folklórico Don Tomás Morel, Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic. Photograph: Raymond Marrero.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, film still, 2014.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, film still, 2014.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, film still, 2014.
  • Nicolás Dumit Estévez, C Room, film still, 2014.

C Room, January 26 & February 21-23, 2014, Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic

Carnivals in Latin America are the Christmas of the indecent, and yet they are invisible in theological discourse.
—Marcella Althaus-Reid, Indecent Theology: Theological Perversions in Sex, Gender, and Politics

Often understood as a cultural event of folkloric or touristic interest, the Dominican carnival remains a quintessential happening, allowing forlorn bodies and nonhegemonic politics to interpolate an increasingly privatized society. It opens a path, machete in hand, for the weird, lo raro, to destabilize the conventional and the given. It rekinks hair straightened by imported relaxers, wrinkles the starched linen suits of the aspiring middle class, and toasts the skin of those who try to watch the parade from a covered balcony. Likewise, the festivity in question overlaps with the anniversary of the independence of the nation, throwing into further tumult inchoate, confused, or perhaps reveling identities. Dominican-ness is hence celebrated amongst and by horned creatures, false-breasted beings, men in military uniforms, and paint-smeared devils sporting tails and carrying pointed tridents.

For En Mas’, I proposed to host an eight-hour performance titled C Room at the Museo Folklórico Don Tomás Morel, in Santiago, Dominican Republic, on January 26, 2014. At that time, the institution was temporarily closed to visitors due to a traumatic loss of part of its collection. I invited friends, acquaintances, friends of friends, and those I met during the carnival season to step through the back door of the museum and into one of the rooms at its rear to co-enact personal fears, taboos, fantasies, and desires related to the vernacular celebration. All of the characters that evolved out of the exchanges in C Room were documented through video, footage that was eventually inserted surreptitiously as five-second silent commercials into the daily programing of two television stations in Santiago over a period of five days. While the identity of the participants remained concealed to the general public, the documentation of their actions left “the closet” in which they were begotten to gently queer and voltear the city.

Updates

“Todo lo que digo es”: Entrevista con Nicolás Dumit Estévez

Arte America recently featured a conversation between EN MAS’ artist Nicolás Dumit Estévez and Alanna Lockward.

Read more »

Nicolás Dumit Estévez Interviewed in Small Axe

Small Axe recently profiled En Mas’ contributing artist Nicolás Dumit Estévez.

Read more »

About the Artist

Nicolás Dumit Estévez

Nicolás Dumit Estévez treads an elusive path that manifests itself performatively or through experiences where the quotidian and art overlap. He has exhibited and performed extensively in the U.S. as well as internationally at venues such as Madrid Abierto/ARCO, The IX Havana Biennial, PERFORMA 05 and 07, IDENSITAT, Prague Quadrennial, The Pontevedra Biennial, The Queens Museum of Art, MoMA, Printed Matter, P.S. 122, Hemispheric Institute of Performance Art and Politics, Princeton University, Rutgers University, The Institute for Art, Religion, and Social Justice at Union Theological Seminary, The MacDowell Colony, Provisions Library, El Museo del Barrio, Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, The Center for Book Arts, Longwood Art Gallery/BCA, The Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian, Franklin Furnace, and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, among others.

During the past seven years Estévez has received mentorship in art in everyday life from Linda Mary Montano, a historic figure in the field of performance art. Montano and Estévez have also collaborated on several performances. Residencies attended include P.S. 1/MoMA, Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. He has received grants from Art Matters, Lambent Foundation, National Association of Latino Arts and Culture, Printed Matter and Puffin Foundation. Estévez Holds an MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA; and an MA from Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York. Estévez has curated exhibitions and programs for El Museo del Barrio, the Institute for Art, Religion and Social Justice at Union Theological Seminary, Longwood Art Gallery/Bronx Council on the Arts, and the Queens Museum of Art, New York; and for the Filmoteca de Andalucía, Córdoba, Spain. He is currently curating an exhibition from El Museo del Barrio’s permanent collection. Publications include Pleased to Meet You, Life as Material for Art and Vice Versa (editor) and For Art’s Sake. Born in Santiago de los Treinta Caballeros, Dominican Republic, in 2011 Estévez was baptized as a Bronxite; a citizen of the Bronx.


INDEPENDENT CURATORS INTERNATIONAL
401 BROADWAY, SUITE 1620
NEW YORK, NY 10013
T: +1 212 254 8200 F: +1 212 477 4781
E: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)