INDEPENDENT CURATORS INTERNATIONAL Research

Fellowship

  • Fellowship: 2014 ICI Curatorial Fellowship: Sumesh Sharma


    ICI’s 2014 Curatorial Fellow Sumesh Sharma seeks to uncover the complex histories of colonialism in Africa, Middle East, and South Asia by examining the funding mechanisms and institutional support of art institutions that utilize the power structures put in place by colonial laws.

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  • Fellowship: The 2014 CPPC Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean

    Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) and ICI announce the 2014 CPPC Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean.

    Application deadline: April 1, 2014

    The Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) and ICI are pleased to announce an open call for curators: The 2014 CPPC Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean. In its third edition, this travel award will support a contemporary art curator based anywhere in the world to travel to Central America and the Caribbean to conduct research about art and cultural activities in the region. Intending to generate new collaborations with artists, curators, museums, and cultural centers in the area, this award will cover curatorial residencies, studio visits, and/or archival research. 

    The CPPC Travel Award will support a curator to visit either one or multiple locations in Central America and the Caribbean, and will prioritize first encounters, allowing curators that have not traveled to the region to make connections and develop networks. The travel period can be anywhere between three weeks and three months, and take place between May and November 2014. The grant will cover costs of up to $10,000. Funds can be requested to visit one or more of the following countries: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama; and, in the Caribbean: The Antilles, The Bahamas, Colombia (Caribbean region), and Turks and Caicos Islands.

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  • Fellowship: Beca 2014 CPPC para viajes de investigación en Centroamérica y el Caribe

    La Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros (CPPC) e Independent Curators International (ICI) se complacen en anunciar la convocatoria a la Beca 2014 Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros para viajes de investigación en Centroamérica y el Caribe.

    Fecha límite para aplicación: 1 de abril, 2014

    En su tercera edición, esta beca de viajes apoyará a un curador radicado en cualquier parte del mundo para que viaje a Centro América y el Caribe a investigar sobre las escenas artísticas y las actividades culturales de la región. Con la intención de generar nuevas colaboraciones con artistas, curadores, museos, y centros culturales de la región, esta beca cubre residencias curatoriales, visitas de estudio e investigación de archivo.

    La beca de viaje CPPC apoyará a que un curador visite uno o múltiples lugares en Centro América y el Caribe, y dará prioridad a primeros encuentros con la región, permitiendo que curadores que no han visitado la región establezcan contacto y desarrollen redes. El período de viaje será entre tres semanas y tres meses, y puede darse entre mayo y noviembre de 2014. La beca cubrirá gastos de hasta $10,000.

    Los fondos pueden ser solicitados para visitar uno más de los siguientes países: Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua y Panamá; y en el Caribe: Antillas Mayores (Cuba, Haití, República Dominicana, Jamaica, Puerto Rico e Islas Caimán), Antillas Menores (Antigua y Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Granada, San Cristóbal y Nieves, San Vicente y las Granadinas, Santa Lucía, Trinidad y Tobago, Islas Vírgenes de Estados Unidos, Antillas Francesas—Guadalupe, Martinica, La Désirade, María Galante, Les Saintes, San Martín, San Bartolomé-, Islas Neerlandesas - Aruba, Bonaire, Curazao, Saba, San Eustaquio, San Marten, Islas Vírgenes Británicas- Anguila, Monserrat, Islas Venezolanas), Bahamas, Colombia (región caribe), e Islas Turcos y Caicos.

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  • Fellowship: Remco de Blaaij Blog Post 5


    Entering the take away restaurant they instantly catch my eye. On the wall there are two photos of a yet unknown geographical nature. One depicts a tall bridge crossing a brown coloured river and the other shows a jungle, somewhere. They are not particularly photographed well, angles are peculiar, lighting is soft and its focus unclear. They must serve as decoration, but to what?

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  • Fellowship: Remco de Blaaij Blog Post 4


    How to organize yourself in a parallel way? Why would this be useful? It’s a question that came up again during my most recent visit to Guatemala after speaking with a wide range of curators, artists, politicians and performers on a road trip to some rural and urban spots.

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  • Fellowship: Remco de Blaaij Blog Post 3


    “Hey man, you should not be doing that man!” I hear from a distance.  A guy is coming up to me repeating that my actions are not so wise.

    I am standing in the middle of Barrio Campo Bruce and struggling to handle two phones as I am looking to call Patrica Belli, whose door I am in front of. I am early, as I am almost always, and I am warned in perfect American English to be careful waving those phones around. I take his advice and quickly tuck away the modern equipment in my waterproof bag.

    ‘Seguridad’ (Security) is a big issue here, actually in Central America in general. It’s very visually present. Over 40 security companies in Managua alone provide heavily armed high-risk security to simple guards in the streets who in the mean time wash your car. They earn around $400, which, so I am told, is a fairly good salary here. Many people work in this business, making it an essential part of a big economic generator.

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  • Fellowship: Remco de Blaaij Blog Post 2


    This week I will leave for the series of trips that will bring me to Central America and the Caribbean, the right moment to go through some speculation and expectations.

    Obviously there is little I can do or say that goes beyond a naïve understanding of where I will travel. I have not been in Nicaragua, Guatemala and Jamaica before and somehow it all feels like ‘a very first school trip’. It seems a childish analogy for me to use, but perhaps the very naivety goes to the core of why I proposed these set of trips and why it is supported. It feels great when one can enter a territory of the unknown, to go in ‘blank’ with the only luggage I have; a guidance, a loose idea, a far away smell or clue, some contacts, but not much more.

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  • Fellowship: Remco de Blaaij Blog Post 1


    I am really happy to announce that my proposal In the Land of the Timid was selected to receive the 2013 CPPC Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean. It is truly an amazing opportunity and I will conduct interviews and do site visits to four countries; Guatemala, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Suriname. Through this website I will put updates on the research travel online and somewhere around the end of 2013 I publish a more comprehensive result of the research. At this point I don’t know what that will be, look or feel like.

    Below is an outline of the proposal:

    In the Land of the Timid is a series of research travels to Guatemala, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Suriname attempting to sketch an incomplete map and library of female activist practices from Central, South America and the Caribbean by focusing on complex influences they had within social active reality and the capability to go beyond by copying their ambition to artistic practices. Oscillating somewhere between known and unknown histories, these voices and practices dispute an existing art historical and social canon and can become capable of functioning outside their activist merits were they have been leaving collective traces such as building up art academies, libraries, schools and political parties from 1950 until today.

    In the Land of the Timid takes its title from the recordings of Le Corbusier’s travels to South America in the early 1920’s, in essence a counter modernist movement by disregarding North America as the center for culture and life. Without building much, Le Corbusier left South America with a wealth of revolutionary ideas on scale, social architecture and a keen philosophical eye on the development in the Americas. The account of the lectures he gave in Argentina and Brazil record one of the first post-colonial anthropological moves made by a culture maker hoping to reverse the center of the world.

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  • Fellowship: 2013 ICI/French Institute Fellow


    Independent Curators International (ICI), l’Institut français in Paris, and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York announce curator Fanny Gonella as the 2013 ICI/French Institute Fellow.

    ICI, l’Institut français in Paris, and the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in New York are pleased to announce that Fanny Gonella has been selected as the second ICI/French Institute Fellow. The fellowship program offers a French curator a new opportunity for international research and the development of professional networks. The program spans over a period of six months and includes two visits to the U.S., where the Fellow will use ICI as a base.

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  • Fellowship: Recipient of the 2013 CPPC Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean


    Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and Independent Curators International are pleased to announce that Remco de Blaaij has been selected as the second recipient of the CPPC Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean. The award supports a contemporary art curator based anywhere in the world to travel to Central America and the Caribbean to conduct research about art and cultural activities in the region. The process will generate new collaborations with artists, curators, museums, and cultural centers in the area.

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  • Fellowship: Muriel Enjalran


    Muriel Enjalran was invited to come to New York from Paris as the first ICI/French Institute Fellow. After participating in ICI’s Curatorial Intensive program in the Summer 2012, she conducted research into artists who engage with the public sphere and explore the relationship between art and politics beyond conventional practices. Enjalran takes the works and activities of Justine Triet, Ângela Ferreira, and Caetano Dias (artists residing across various continents) as a departure point for interrogating how their work attempts to redefine aesthetics, therefore redefining art and politics while engaging with the social.

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  • Fellowship: Public Program organized by Övül Durmusoğlu and Mari Spirito

    Join ICI’s 2012 Fellows Övül Durmusoğlu and Mari Spirito for a roundtable discussion with Rossella Biscotti and Akram Zaatari at SALT, Ankara.

    Ancient Works / Asar-ı Atika is a research project in collaboration with Rossella Biscotti and Akram Zaatari on processing multiple historical narratives.

    This project brings together two artists who have, at the base of their practice, extensive research into a wide range of histories as well as narratives that expand possible readings of personal and political events. This project brings Biscotti and Zaatari into the specific context of the Museum of Antonian Civilizations, one of the first cultural institutions established by the Turkish Republic, at the time of the nation’s foundation, 1923.

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